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FED Multiple Framefinder


Production started on the accessories for the FED in 1938. The multiple framefinder was avaliable in very limited quantities and may have only been a prototype. I have only seen 2 and both were slightly different and showed signs of having been hand made. It fit into the accessory shoe and had to be adjusted for each focal length 28mm, 50mm, and 100mm.


{Top of FED Viewfinder} {Right Side of FED Viewfinder}

FED 100mm Viewfinder


The viewfinder for the100mm lens is a little chrome tube on a foot to fit the accessory shoe. It adjusts for parralax as you set the distance. The case was a little red cloth covered cardboard box with a rounded end.


{FED 100mm viewer}

FED Right Angle Viewfinder


This was a copy of the Leica accessory. It gives a right angle view when the camera is held at a 90 degree angle. I suspect that the reason it is almost always found in like new condition is that the users found, as I have, that it is easier to just turn the camera than to fool with the viewfinder. It came in a brown leather case marked FED.


{FED right angle viewfinder} {FED right angle viewfinder}

FED Selftimer


The FED self timer is correctly called the "Auto Portrait". It had a curved mirror on the back where you could set the timer and see your reflection to take your own picture.It came in a brown leather case marked FED.


{FED self timer}

FED Lightmeter


This is a round selenium lightmeter calibrated in GOST. It was made for only a little while before the war and most do not work.It came in a brown leather case marked FED.


{FED light meter} {FED light meter}

Zenit Flash Synchronizer


This adapter provides flash synchronization with flash bulbs for a camera that was not made with internal synchronization. It came in a loosly fitting black plastic cylindrical case.

For those of you who want to use one here are the instructions:

Before you even get started you will have have the camera serviced to ensure that the shutter speeds are accurate. The next step will involve a lot of trial and error. There is an adjustment screw to set the delay time below the KMZ symbol on the narrower section of the body. It is only visable when the movable rod is in the full up position. You will note that the movable pin has a slot in the end to adjust the length. The screw is really a set screw to lock the adjustment, it needs to be loosened to adjust the length of the sync delay by turning the rod. The basic procedure is to loosen the set screw, adjust the delay, tighten the set screw and test the delay until you get it right..


{Zenit Flash Synchronizer}

Self timers


There were 2 accessory self timers available a phneumatic and a mechanical model. One plugged directly into the camera and the other used a cable release. The round one is pneumatic and the square one is mechanical.


{Self timer a} {Self timer b front} {Self timer b back}

Fed Clamp


These are little clamps with a ball head to mount the camera. They also had a screw that you could screw into any convenient tree or other wooden item. Post war a much cheaper version was made.


{fedclamp} {fedclamp}

Smena Rangefinders


There were three models made for the Smena cameras with minor cosmetic differences. They came in a brown leather case marked Smena.They can also be found in a rare version marked DP with the MMZ logo.


{Lomo rangefinder} {top of Lomo rangefinder } { front of Smena rangefinder a}
{top of Smena rangefinder a} {front of Smena rangefinder b} {top of Smena rangefinder b }

Blik Rangefinder


This appears to be a moderenized version of the Smena rangefinder. The name means blink. It comes in a black plastic case.


{Blik rangefinder} {top of Blik rangefinder}

Multiple Viewfinder


The multiple viewfinders were initially just copies of the Zeiss. One change was made. Instead of covering the area outside of the lens frame it was left clear to make action shots easier. The first models had the rotor on the right and were marked Zorki. This was changed to the left because it covered the speed dial on the camera and made changing shutter speeds difficult. Although there are variations in the inscriptions there is no evidence that there were seperate models for different cameras.


 Multiple Viewfinder  Multiple Viewfinder  Multiple Viewfinder
 Multiple Viewfinder  Multiple Viewfinder  Multiple Viewfinder

35mm Viewfinder


There was a small metal and plastic, later all plastic, viewfinder made for the 35 mm lens.


 35mm Viewfinder  35mm Viewfinder

85mm Viewfinder


There was a small metal and plastic, later all plastic, viewfinder for the 85 mm lens.


 35mm Viewfinder  35mm Viewfinder

Zorki Stereo Adapter


There was a stereo adapter made for the Zorki cameras. The manual shows it mounted on a Zorki2. The optical prism splitter mounts on the bottom of the camera. There is also an optical viewfinder that mounts in the accessory shoe of the Zorki. It also comes with a printing frame and a viewer for the stereo pairs.


 Zorki Stereo adapter box top  Zorki Stereo adapter boxed  set  Zorki Stereo adapter  set

Kiev Stereo Adapter


There was a stereo adapter made for the Kiev cameras. The optical unit consisted of a prism splitter that mounted on the lens and a small metal framefinder. The framefinder is almost always lost. The set came with a printing frame and a viewer for the stereo pairs. there was also a small plastic case for the prism splitter.


 Kiev Stereo adapter box top  Kiev Stereo adapter boxed  set  Kiev Stereo adapter  set

© Nathan Dayton 2000